Leftover Focus

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WELP, fuck everything. Sorry guys, see you later.

— 1 week ago
vita-insectum:

sunshineater:

"The ability of a dragonfly nymph to successfully snatch and grab food is directly related to its anus. The mouth-grabber (labium) is hydraulically activated.  The dragonfly draws water in through the anus, clenches, then compresses its abdominal and thoracic muscles against the water-filled rectal chamber. This raises the internal body cavity pressure, and pushes the labium out –in a strike that takes 10 to 30 milliseconds.”
Gwen Pearson, Here Be Dragons Wired Science
Dragonflies are my favorite. Go look at the rest of the pictures!

Never seen this happen before. This is incredibly badass

Dragonfly nymphs breathe through their butts, as well (their gills are located inside the rectum). They also move via jet propulsion by sucking a whole bunch of water in their butts and expelling it out super fast. 
So, basically, dragonflies know how to utilize their rear ends, to say the least. They are so freaking bad ass (pun intended).
I really miss having my aquatics tank. Maybe I’ll revive it this summer…

vita-insectum:

sunshineater:

"The ability of a dragonfly nymph to successfully snatch and grab food is directly related to its anus. The mouth-grabber (labium) is hydraulically activated.  The dragonfly draws water in through the anus, clenches, then compresses its abdominal and thoracic muscles against the water-filled rectal chamber. This raises the internal body cavity pressure, and pushes the labium out –in a strike that takes 10 to 30 milliseconds.”

Gwen Pearson, Here Be Dragons Wired Science

Dragonflies are my favorite. Go look at the rest of the pictures!

Never seen this happen before. This is incredibly badass

Dragonfly nymphs breathe through their butts, as well (their gills are located inside the rectum). They also move via jet propulsion by sucking a whole bunch of water in their butts and expelling it out super fast. 

So, basically, dragonflies know how to utilize their rear ends, to say the least. They are so freaking bad ass (pun intended).

I really miss having my aquatics tank. Maybe I’ll revive it this summer…

— 1 week ago with 117 notes
You guys!!! First bug of the season! I little ichneumonid lady that landed on the inside of my glasses (and moved before I could get a photo…). It kinda IS spring!

You guys!!! First bug of the season! I little ichneumonid lady that landed on the inside of my glasses (and moved before I could get a photo…). It kinda IS spring!

— 1 week ago with 9 notes

astronomy-to-zoology:

Cathedra serrata

…an unique species of lanternfly that is endemic to Suriname. Like other lanternflies this species processes a hollow proboscis, which bears a resemblance to a saw. Which despite its menacing appearance is relatively harmless. Much of Cathedra serrata’s biology and ecology remains unknown, but it likely lives off a diet of plants like other planthoppers.

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Hemiptera-Fulgoroidea-Fulgoridae-Cathedra-C. serrata

Images: Instituto Nacional de Biodiversidad and realbutterflygifts

(via vita-insectum)

— 1 week ago with 656 notes

meladoodle:

fallingpandas:

meladoodle:

when he licks his lips seductively
image


what the fuck is that thing?

my boyfriend :)

(Source: meladoodle, via madgrowler)

— 1 week ago with 306813 notes
astronomy-to-zoology:

Genus: Macroxiphus
Macroxiphus is a genus of unusual katydids (Tettigoniidae) that are distributed throughout South East Asia and Micronesia. Members of Macroxiphus are unique in that their larvae are exceptional ant mimics, and use their mimicry to trick potential predators into thinking they are harmful ants. Macroxiphus spp. will lose this disguise as they move on into adulthood.
Classification
Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Orthoptera-Ensifera-Tettigoniidea-Tettigonioidea-Tettigoniidae-Macroxiphus
Image: Muhammad Mahdi Karim

astronomy-to-zoology:

Genus: Macroxiphus

Macroxiphus is a genus of unusual katydids (Tettigoniidae) that are distributed throughout South East Asia and Micronesia. Members of Macroxiphus are unique in that their larvae are exceptional ant mimics, and use their mimicry to trick potential predators into thinking they are harmful ants. Macroxiphus spp. will lose this disguise as they move on into adulthood.

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Orthoptera-Ensifera-Tettigoniidea-Tettigonioidea-Tettigoniidae-Macroxiphus

Image: Muhammad Mahdi Karim

(via rhamphotheca)

— 1 week ago with 149 notes

drhoz:

I have no idea what these used to belong to - I don’t much attention to the chordates, since they’re so few in number and variety.

Of course, if you know they are, feel free to comment.

Munster and Ravenswood, Perth?

— 1 week ago with 10 notes
rhamphotheca:

 The Creature Feature: 10 Fun Facts About Velvet Worms
by Mary Bates
Velvet worms, otherwise known as Onychophora, are reclusive little animals that have changed very little in the last 500 million years.
Scientists have described some 180 modern species. They can be found in moist, dark places all around the tropics and Australia and New Zealand. Smaller species are less than an inch long, while the largest reach lengths of about 8 inches.
They come in a dazzling array of colors and exhibit some pretty weird and complex behaviors. I’m sure you’ll be just as charmed by them as I am.
1. Velvet worms have hydrostatic skeletons. Velvet worms don’t have hard exoskeletons like arthropods. Instead, their fluid-filled body cavities are covered in a thin skin and kept rigid by their pressurized internal liquids. They move by the alteration of fluid pressure in the limbs as they extend and contract along the body…
(read more: Wired Science)
photo: Peripatoides novazealandiae by Frupus, via Flickr.

rhamphotheca:

 The Creature Feature: 10 Fun Facts About Velvet Worms

by Mary Bates

Velvet worms, otherwise known as Onychophora, are reclusive little animals that have changed very little in the last 500 million years.

Scientists have described some 180 modern species. They can be found in moist, dark places all around the tropics and Australia and New Zealand. Smaller species are less than an inch long, while the largest reach lengths of about 8 inches.

They come in a dazzling array of colors and exhibit some pretty weird and complex behaviors. I’m sure you’ll be just as charmed by them as I am.

1. Velvet worms have hydrostatic skeletons. Velvet worms don’t have hard exoskeletons like arthropods. Instead, their fluid-filled body cavities are covered in a thin skin and kept rigid by their pressurized internal liquids. They move by the alteration of fluid pressure in the limbs as they extend and contract along the body…

(read more: Wired Science)

photo: Peripatoides novazealandiae by Frupus, via Flickr.

(via libutron)

— 1 week ago with 292 notes

escapekit:

Amazing Macro Photos of Bugs 

Stockholm-based photographer John Hallmén captures amazing macro shots of insects.

(Source: johnhallmen.se, via dendroica)

— 1 week ago with 1787 notes