Leftover Focus

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Preface: I think, for a few months anyway, that this blog is going to become an emotional dump as well as a zoological nerd blog. If that’s not cool with you, please go ahead and unfollow me. Venting on this site is just as cathartic as getting engrossed in all the science. So thanks for understanding (or not, it’s all cool).

Welp, “g’night” turned into “have deep conversations and take shots with your mom (P.S. This rarely rarely rarely happens with my mother).” My life is currently a mess. But I’m okay with it right now. I feel like I’m on a path (step 1: identify a path) and I feel really good about it. Setbacks are expected, but I can overcome them. Despite the situation, I still feel more emotionally healthy than ever. Not everything is ideal (ha), but I can still do this. I hope I can remember this when the inevitable bad days come.

— 1 hour ago with 3 notes

clusterpod:

Pixie’s Parasol, Mycena interrupta

Betts Vale, Tasmania

(via libutron)

— 2 hours ago with 730 notes

Today wasn’t even close to being as bad as I thought it was going to be. I was suuuuper productive and proactive and I’m really proud of myself. I’m gonna give myself a little time to wallow, because, let’s face it, wallowing is just necessary sometimes. But that’s okay. And I’m okay. 

I have no idea why or how I’m still awake right now. G’night, tumblr.

— 4 hours ago with 2 notes
#look at me being awesome  #suck it world  #but no hard feelings  #it is Earth Day after all  #Happy Earth Day world 

hyacynthus:

adorablesnakes:

snake-lovers:

Dasypeltis sp.

Snakes are weirdos in the best possible way.

They actually break the egg using hypapophyses on the ventral side of their vertebral column - spines that stick out of the belly-side as seen in the photos below:

For more photos and videos of these wonderful snakes doing their derpy egg-cracking wriggle, I refer you to this excellent blog post here!

(Photos from Google Images)

Egg-eating snakes are my jam. (I used to feed my corn snake the eggs that my mom’s finches would lay…)

(via bullshit-bullsharks)

— 4 hours ago with 3667 notes

astronomy-to-zoology:

Mertensia ovum

Commonly known as the “Arctic Comb Jelly” or “Sea Nut” Mertensia ovum is a species of cydippid ctenophore that occurs in Arctic and polar seas. Like many other ctenophores M. ovum is weakly bioluminescent and can produce a striking rainbow effect by beating their eight rows of cilia. Mertensia ovum is a carnivore and will feed on copepods and other small crustaceans that are snagged by its two sticky tentacles. 

Classification

Animalia-Ctenophora-Tentaculata-Cydippida-Merensiidae-Mertensia-M. ovum

Images: NOAA and Giro720

Ctenophores are my jam.

— 4 hours ago with 193 notes
buggirl:

Lovely female Spider Wasp.  Ecuadorians call them “Devil’s little horses” in Spanish and I just love that name.  It is so suiting for them, how they fly, and hunt spiders…   I had a brief and unsuccessful attempt at studying them while in Ecuador.

Pompilids are my jam.

buggirl:

Lovely female Spider Wasp.  Ecuadorians call them “Devil’s little horses” in Spanish and I just love that name.  It is so suiting for them, how they fly, and hunt spiders…   I had a brief and unsuccessful attempt at studying them while in Ecuador.

Pompilids are my jam.

— 4 hours ago with 71 notes
dendroica:

Agapostemon coloradinus, F, side 1, Shannon Co., S. Dakota_2014-01-09-14.42.33 ZS PMax by Sam Droege on Flickr.

A large bright green with blue overtones Agapostemon from Badlands National Park. One of several species present there and very similar to A. virescens and a bit tricky to tell apart. Photo by Wayne Boo with help from Ben Smith on upping the Photoshopping techniques.

dendroica:

Agapostemon coloradinus, F, side 1, Shannon Co., S. Dakota_2014-01-09-14.42.33 ZS PMax by Sam Droege on Flickr.

A large bright green with blue overtones Agapostemon from Badlands National Park. One of several species present there and very similar to A. virescens and a bit tricky to tell apart. Photo by Wayne Boo with help from Ben Smith on upping the Photoshopping techniques.

— 4 hours ago with 165 notes
earthstory:



Fossil bees!This pair of images shows, on top, a modern-day leafcutter bee from the species Megachile rotundata and a very cool fossil find from the LaBrea Tar Pits.The bees come from a pair of full nests exhumed from a part of the tar pits; the same location has produced bones from animals 23,000 to 40,000 years old, and carbon-14 dating of the material in the nests gives the same age, so these bees are about that old. Many interesting specimens are preserved in the nests and have been found by scientists exhuming material from the tar pits, including the leafy walls of the nests themselves, adults, and pupae like this one.The bees are from species that are widespread in the United States, but the presence of these bees at this site actually helps constrain how their distributions have changed during the big climate shifts that happened since the nests were made. The bees today have expanded ranges at higher elevations than is suggested by these fossil finds, indicating that as the climate of the area warmed, the bees moved uphill to follow similar temperature levels.-JBBLozImage credit:Image credit: PLOS One (Open access journal):http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi/10.1371/journal.pone.0094724

earthstory:

Fossil bees!

This pair of images shows, on top, a modern-day leafcutter bee from the species Megachile rotundata and a very cool fossil find from the LaBrea Tar Pits.

The bees come from a pair of full nests exhumed from a part of the tar pits; the same location has produced bones from animals 23,000 to 40,000 years old, and carbon-14 dating of the material in the nests gives the same age, so these bees are about that old. Many interesting specimens are preserved in the nests and have been found by scientists exhuming material from the tar pits, including the leafy walls of the nests themselves, adults, and pupae like this one.

The bees are from species that are widespread in the United States, but the presence of these bees at this site actually helps constrain how their distributions have changed during the big climate shifts that happened since the nests were made. The bees today have expanded ranges at higher elevations than is suggested by these fossil finds, indicating that as the climate of the area warmed, the bees moved uphill to follow similar temperature levels.

-JBB

Loz

Image credit:

Image credit: PLOS One (Open access journal):
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi/10.1371/journal.pone.0094724

(via dendroica)

— 4 hours ago with 130 notes
lobo-de-luna:

My friend from this morning. It was kind of shy at first but then didn’t mind exploring my hand. So delicate. I never knew they had hairy legs.
Liberty Creek, Washington
4-22-14

Lovely!

lobo-de-luna:

My friend from this morning. It was kind of shy at first but then didn’t mind exploring my hand. So delicate. I never knew they had hairy legs.

Liberty Creek, Washington

4-22-14

Lovely!

— 4 hours ago with 17 notes

lobo-de-luna:

Liberty creek

Bird’s nest fungus is so rad.

— 11 hours ago with 16 notes