This weekend was awesome. I made some new friends, got to hang out with my sister, and took advantage of the warm weather and spent some time in the mountains.

I actually started my new job, today, too! Pretty much nailed it. Also, and old friend is visiting today! Way excited to see him.

These next couple weeks are going to be pretty crazy, but I’m looking forward to it!

endangereduglythings:

chalkandwater:

Dragonfly nymphs are voracious predators, hunting everything from mosquito larvae to fish and tadpoles. Their lower jaw is extendable, allowing the nymph to strike with great speed.

[video]

I always have fun showing larval odonata to people who don’t know. The adults are jewel-like flitting creatures. The babies are horrible crab aliens with projectile jaws.

Nature is amazing.

Also, any creature that can rocket forward by jet propulsion via their butts is pretty freaking high in my book.

reptiliaherps:

pogosticks:

Aviad Bar

 Common Sand Vipers (Cerastes vipera) עכן קטן


LOOK AT THEIR LITTLE BUTTS OH MY /GOD/

bullshit-bullsharks:

Tantalus grooming himself.

WOW

jtotheizzoe:

biomorphosis:

When you flip bats upside down they become exceptionally sassy dancers [x].

I have been laughing at this for at least 5 minutes straight.

Chiroptera choreography!

(via bullshit-bullsharks)

rhamphotheca:

Leaders of the Pack:
Not everyone was happy when wolves returned to Yellowstone (the deer, for one), but the place is better with them there.  
 by Rocky Kistner 
Wyoming wolves had reason to howl in victory last month when a federal court gave them back their protected status under the Endangered Species Act. A judge ruled that the state’s management of the species—which included a shoot-on-sight policy and a trophy-hunting range—was inadequate for sustaining a viable wolf population. (Disclosure: NRDC, OnEarth’s publisher, was a plaintiff in the case.)
Since the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service removed the gray wolf from the endangered species list in Wyoming in 2012, hunters have killed more than 200 of the animals in the state. For those who think that’s okay, this video is for you…
(read more: On Earth)
photograph by Shawn Kinkade

rhamphotheca:

Leaders of the Pack:

Not everyone was happy when wolves returned to Yellowstone (the deer, for one), but the place is better with them there.

Wyoming wolves had reason to howl in victory last month when a federal court gave them back their protected status under the Endangered Species Act. A judge ruled that the state’s management of the species—which included a shoot-on-sight policy and a trophy-hunting range—was inadequate for sustaining a viable wolf population. (Disclosure: NRDC, OnEarth’s publisher, was a plaintiff in the case.)

Since the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service removed the gray wolf from the endangered species list in Wyoming in 2012, hunters have killed more than 200 of the animals in the state. For those who think that’s okay, this video is for you…

(read more: On Earth)

photograph by Shawn Kinkade

rhamphotheca:

What Causes Brazil’s ‘Meeting of the Waters’?
by Bec Crew
This is what it looks like when the Solimões River meets the Rio Negro in Brazil.
Almost 10 kilometres from the inland city of Manaus in northern Brazil, ‘the Meeting of the Waters’ is the point where two of Amazon River’s largest tributaries - a smaller river that flows into a bigger ‘parent’ river - converge but never mix.
The Solimões River forms the lighter half, its ‘cafe au lait’ colouring owed to the rich sediment that runs down from the Andes Mountains, including sand, mud and silt. Known as a ‘white water river’, the Solimões River stretches over a 1600 km distance. 
The darker side is the Rio Negro, and it gets its ‘black tea’ hue from leaf and plant matter that has decayed and dissolved in the water. It might look dark and murky, but the Rio Negro carries little or no sediment, and according to the European Space Agency website, is considered one of the cleanest natural waters in the world. On really clear days, water visibility in this black water river can exceed nine metres. ..
(read more: Science Alert - Australia)
Image: Danocoo1/Reddit.com

rhamphotheca:

What Causes Brazil’s ‘Meeting of the Waters’?

by Bec Crew

This is what it looks like when the Solimões River meets the Rio Negro in Brazil.

Almost 10 kilometres from the inland city of Manaus in northern Brazil, ‘the Meeting of the Waters’ is the point where two of Amazon River’s largest tributaries - a smaller river that flows into a bigger ‘parent’ river - converge but never mix.

The Solimões River forms the lighter half, its ‘cafe au lait’ colouring owed to the rich sediment that runs down from the Andes Mountains, including sand, mud and silt. Known as a ‘white water river’, the Solimões River stretches over a 1600 km distance. 

The darker side is the Rio Negro, and it gets its ‘black tea’ hue from leaf and plant matter that has decayed and dissolved in the water. It might look dark and murky, but the Rio Negro carries little or no sediment, and according to the European Space Agency website, is considered one of the cleanest natural waters in the world. On really clear days, water visibility in this black water river can exceed nine metres. ..

(read more: Science Alert - Australia)

Image: Danocoo1/Reddit.com

dendroica:

Colletes sp., possibly Colletes speculiferus (by Dendroica cerulea)

Cuuuuuute

dendroica:

Colletes sp., possibly Colletes speculiferus (by Dendroica cerulea)

Cuuuuuute

(Source: baroness, via hedysarum)

nycbugman:

Ceratina calcarata- Spurred Ceratina

 

Cutie! This is a male.